Baker Hansen: How unique (costly) dinners are driving younger cooks on Omaha’s meals scene | information



Well-known Japanese sushi chef Hiroyuki Sato is putting a piece of sushi he made during a private event in Yoshitomo earlier this month in front of a dinner party.



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David Utterback (left) and Hiroyuki Sato discuss sushi before serving guests at a private event in Yoshitomo earlier this month.



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Renowned Japanese sushi chef Hiroyuki Sato poses for a photo with a piece of tuna for guests at a private event in Yoshitomo earlier this month



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Well-known Japanese sushi chef Hiroyuki Sato is slicing a piece of tuna for a private event at Yoshitomo earlier this month.



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A large piece of tuna that can be sliced ​​and served during a private event in Yoshitomo earlier this month.



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Sliced ​​tuna to be served at a private event in Yoshitomo earlier this month.



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Renowned Japanese sushi chef Hiroyuki Sato is preparing sushi with flounder during a private event at Yoshitomo earlier this month.



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Hiroyuki Sato prepares sushi for a private event at Yoshitomo on 6009 Maple Street on June 11, 2019.



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Hakkoku, Hiro Sato’s sushi restaurant in Tokyo, only seats six guests at a time and is always sold out. One diner was so eager to eat Sato’s sushi that it flew from Japan to attend this month’s dinner in Yoshitomo.



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Well-known Japanese sushi chef Hiroyuki Sato is leaving the kitchen while working at a private event in Yoshitomo earlier this month.



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Renowned Japanese sushi chef Hiroyuki Sato is serving up a slice of sushi with squid for a dinner earlier this month during a private event at Yoshitomo.



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Well-known Japanese sushi chef Hiroyuki Sato (right) hands fresh sushi to Melissa Lang during a private event in Yoshitomo earlier this month.



Sato and Utterback

Hiroyuki Sato (left) and David Utterback pose for a portrait in Yoshitomo earlier this month.

By Sarah Baker Hansen World Herald Associate

When one of Japan’s hottest chefs – a man with a constantly sold out six-seat restaurant that makes some of the best sushi in the world – agrees to cook in your restaurant for the first time in the US, you won’t save any hassle.

“Sending half the fish,” said Yoshitomo owner and chef Dave Utterback, “was more than my mortgage.”

Forty-eight lucky Omahans ate this fish on two evenings earlier this month when chef Hiro Sato, who runs Hakkoku in Ginza, Tokyo, came to Omaha to prepare his special, elegant brand of sushi at Yoshitomo in Benson.

Here’s a fact, I think, that confirms what a big deal this was: A diner flew to Omaha to eat Sato’s sushi. From Japan.

He couldn’t get to Sato’s restaurant in Tokyo, he said, and decided to come to Nebraska instead.



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Hiroyuki Sato prepares tossaki during a private event in Yoshitomo earlier this month.


CHRIS MACHIAN / THE WORLD HERALD

The guests traveled not only from Japan, but also from New York, Denver, Chicago and other countries to take advantage of the dinner. But the majority of the guests who attended the dinner were from Omaha, according to Utterback.

I attended the Yoshitomo dinner and a few days earlier I attended Chef Austin Johnson’s second Omaha dinner in Block 16. He is from Omaha and used to be from Frenchie, Paris. Both guest chefs have received a Michelin star. (Earlier this week, an article on Eater focused on Johnson’s next move: opening a restaurant in New York’s Tribeca neighborhood with a sommelier from Eleven Madison Park. The same sommelier selected the wines for Johnson’s Omaha dinner.)

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