Man accused of stabbing mom within the Omaha pharmacy, battling schizophrenia

Alan Terhaar is charged with first degree murder and the use of a weapon to commit a crime in prison. According to Omaha Police, Terhaar admitted stabbing his mother, Carmen Terhaar, outside a Midtown pharmacy on Friday night. “They were best friends and she did everything for him,” said Reina Terhaar-Reyes, Carmen’s daughter. “Even if he didn’t behave properly and didn’t take his medicine.” Reyes said her mother was taking Alan to get his medicine Friday night when she was stabbed to death at the Kubat pharmacy near 49th and Center. “They said he came out with a big smile,” Reyes said. “My mother said whenever he smiled like that, it wasn’t him, it was his mental illness.” Reyes told KETV NewsWatch 7 that Alan is battling schizophrenia and never got the help he needed. “She was telling me, she was telling the family, she was telling the therapists, she was telling all these different places to help, especially with mental illness, and no one was helping,” Reyes explained. The KETV NewsWatch 7 investigation team found that Terhaar had previously attacked his mother. In a 2013 protection order, Carmen described the incident as a “brutal whipping”. Carmen said in a protective warrant that her son threw her down a flight of stairs and added, strangling her, tied her hands and mouth, and stuffed her in a pocket before she could barely escape. Court documents show that Carmen eventually dropped the protection order and Terhaar was imprisoned for about a year, but Carmen never gave up on her son. Our investigative team also checked court records from 2010 and showed that the juvenile court knew Terhaar had been diagnosed with psychosis. When Carmen applied for a protection order, she informed the judge that her son was mentally ill in the past and abused drugs such as K2 and bath salts. “Everyone told her, I even told her,” Reyes said. “She said, ‘No, this is my son, and you don’t just give up on the family.’” Reyes said her mother’s love was really unconditional and she prayed that the spark of her mother’s story would change. “I don’t get upset with him because I know it wasn’t him,” Reyes said. “My mother would say it wasn’t him that she forgive him and she loves him because that’s what kind of person she was.” Loren Dexter, a psychotherapist with SAGE counseling in Omaha, said schizophrenics need support. “It’s important to have comprehensive care. Schizophrenia, ideal for a medical professional, a psychological exam,” said Dexter. The first step is for families to find resources, the Nebraska Family Helpline or NAMI. And sometimes a hospital can be the best place to start care. A psychological exam can help figure out what’s going on. “If you are obviously careful, you never want to feel like you haven’t done enough,” he said. He calls this situation a tragedy and encourages families struggling with mental health to keep looking for help until they find the right solution: “I hope everyone can really try to understand what someone is going through and when he doesn’t have all the answers to ask for help. ”Dexter said. Reyes started a fundraiser to raise money for her mother’s funeral. Click here to donate.

Alan Terhaar is charged with first degree murder and the use of a weapon to commit a crime in prison. According to Omaha Police, Terhaar admitted stabbing his mother, Carmen Terhaar, outside a Midtown pharmacy on Friday night.

“They were best friends and she did everything for him,” said Reina Terhaar-Reyes, Carmen’s daughter. “Even if he didn’t do the right thing and didn’t take his medicine.”

Reyes said her mother took Alan to get his medicine on Friday night when she was stabbed to death at the Kubat pharmacy near 49th and Center streets.

“They said he came out with a big smile,” Reyes said. “My mother said whenever he smiled like that, it wasn’t him, it was his mental illness.”

Reyes told KETV NewsWatch 7 that Alan battled schizophrenia and never got the help he needed.

“She [Carmen] told me, she was telling the family, she was telling the therapists, she was telling all these different places that are supposed to help, especially with mental illness, and no one helped, ”Reyes explained.

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Alan Terhaar (L) is accused of murdering his mother Carmen Terhaar (R). Police say he stabbed her Friday night.

Carmen’s daughter says Alan is battling schizophrenia and that her mother worked YEARS to help him but was unsuccessful.

This exclusive interview at 6. @KETV pic.twitter.com/d7lmikCKSV

– DaLaun Dillard (@DDillardTV) October 20, 2020

The KETV NewsWatch 7 investigation team found that Terhaar had previously attacked his mother.

In a 2013 protection order, Carmen described the incident as a “brutal beating”.

Carmen said in a protection warrant that her son threw her down a flight of stairs, adding that he strangled her, tied her hands and mouth, and stuffed her in a pocket before she barely escaped.

Court documents show that Carmen eventually dropped the protection order and Terhaar was imprisoned for about a year, but Carmen never gave up on her son.

Our investigative team also checked court records from 2010 and showed that the juvenile court knew Terhaar had been diagnosed with psychosis. When Carmen applied for a protection order, she informed the judge that her son was mentally ill in the past and abused drugs such as K2 and bath salts.

“Everyone told her [give up]I even told her, “said Reyes.” She said, “No, this is my son, and you’re not just giving up the family.”

Reyes said her mother’s love is truly unconditional and she prays that the sparks of her mother’s story will change.

“I don’t get upset with him because I know it wasn’t him,” Reyes said. “My mother would say it wasn’t him that she forgive him and she loves him because that’s what kind of person she was.”

Loren Dexter, a psychotherapist with SAGE counseling in Omaha, said schizophrenics need support.

“It’s important to have comprehensive care. Schizophrenia, ideal for a health professional, psychological assessment,” said Dexter.

He said the first step is for families to find resources through the Nebraska Family Helpline, or NAMI. And sometimes the best place to start care is in a hospital.

A psychological assessment can help figure out what’s going on.

“Obviously, erring on the caution side, you never want to feel like you haven’t done enough,” he said.

He calls this situation a tragedy and encourages families struggling with mental health to keep looking for help until they find the right fit.

“I hope everyone can really try to understand what someone is going through, and when they don’t have all the answers, to ask for help,” said Dexter.

Reyes started a fundraiser to raise money for her mother’s funeral. Click here to donate.

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