Omaha nonprofit change corporations with file demand for meals

At Together Omaha, eating goes fast. The non-profit organization that provides homelessness ending and prevention services typically serves between 100 and 150 people in their pantry every day. During the COVID-19 outbreak, President and CEO Mike Hornacek said demand is growing rapidly. According to Hornacek, the organization served 962 people on Monday alone. “You have a lot of people who are being laid off or are really worried that they will be laid off,” said Hornacek. A few weeks ago, Hornacek said the organization had adjusted operations and started handing out boxes of groceries from the building’s loading ramp to distance themselves socially. Even that carries a risk. “There have been a number of people who started here and went all the way to 24th Street and when you have that many people in one place it’s really a big public health problem,” Hornacek said. From Tuesday, the organization will distribute food through a drive-up system. Hornacek said the building’s location on 24th and Leavenworth Streets was challenging. “Leavenworth and 24th Street are both major arteries,” said Hornacek. He said the Omaha police were working with Together Omaha to come up with a plan and officers would be there on Tuesday. Together, Omaha is asking people to get access to the grocery collection from 25th Street. Those who do not have a vehicle can still pick up groceries at the main entrance of the building. In addition to the question of how to deal with distributions, the organization has problems with having enough food to distribute. “Some of these donations from these grocery stores are seeing such increases in customers that our donations are falling far behind,” said Stephanie Strode, operations manager of Together Omaha. Hornacek said the organization spends much more on groceries as some donations have decreased and demand has increased. He said that they are committed to helping those in need, but they also need help. “We now need financial donations to add staff and continue to buy food,” said Hornacek.

At Together Omaha, eating goes fast.

The non-profit organization that provides homelessness ending and prevention services typically serves between 100 and 150 people in their pantry every day.

During the COVID-19 outbreak, President and CEO Mike Hornacek said demand is growing rapidly. According to Hornacek, the organization served 962 people on Monday alone.

“You have a lot of people who are being laid off or are really worried that they will be laid off,” said Hornacek.

A few weeks ago, Hornacek said the organization had adjusted operations and started handing out boxes of groceries from the building’s loading ramp to distance themselves socially.

Even that carries a risk.

“There were a number of people who started here and went all the way to 24th Street, and when you have that many people in one place, it’s really a big public health problem,” said Hornacek.

From Tuesday, the organization will distribute food through a drive-up system. Hornacek said the building’s location on 24th and Leavenworth Streets was challenging.

“Leavenworth and 24th Street are both major arteries,” said Hornacek.

He said the Omaha police were working with Together Omaha to come up with a plan and officers would be there on Tuesday.

Together, Omaha is asking people to get access to the grocery collection from 25th Street. If you don’t have a vehicle, you can still pick up groceries at the main entrance of the building.

In addition to the question of how to deal with distributions, the organization has problems with having enough food to distribute.

“Some of these donations from these grocery stores are seeing such increases in customers that our donations are falling far behind,” said Stephanie Strode, operations manager of Together Omaha.

Hornacek said the organization spends much more on groceries as some donations have decreased and demand has increased. He said they are determined to serve those in need, but they also need help.

“We now need financial donations so that we can employ staff and continue to buy food,” said Hornacek.

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