Omaha Public Faculties outlines plans for pathways and academies in any respect excessive faculties

When the Omaha Public Schools presented their plan for changes to the programming and timetables in the high schools, Superintendent Dr. Cheryl Logan that it is a call to action not to accept the status quo. “Although change is difficult, it is the only constant in life.” Logan said, “College and career academies represent the evolution of high school programming.” The district declares that the freshman will choose either an academy or a path. Academies are a “small learning community with a professional focus”. Pathways are “a series of four or more classes that focus on a group of related careers. Students on a pathway take courses with a variety of other students across professional interests.” Here is a breakdown of the vocational education program by school. Benenson High School: ● Academy of Health Professions ● Academy of Design and Construction ● Academy of Business and Entrepreneurship ● CambridgeBryan High School: ● Academy of Design and Construction ● Academy of Transportation, Sales and Logistics ● Academy of Teaching and Leadership ● Academy of Urban Agriculture ● CambridgeBurke High School: ● Aerospace Academy ● Leadership Academy ● Communication Academy Central High School: ● Arts ● Leadership ● International BaccalaureateNorth High School: ● Engineering and Design Academy ● Academy of Science and Research ● Academy of Computer Science and TechnologyNorthwest High School: ● Public and Nonprofit Service ● Early College ProgramSouth High School: ● Dual Language ● Performing and Fine Arts ● Technology and Media Arts ● Cam bridgeNew High School 156th and Ida: ● Health ● Sustainability ● BusinessNew 60th and L: ● SMART Technology ● Health & Education ● Cambridge All students attend d he attend freshman academy to explore different careers. Traditional core classes will continue to be part of the curriculum. OPS will implement block planning across the district. Some parents are concerned about this change in planning. “I know the block map is a waste of time,” said Kimberly Shaneyfelt. The board members had their own questions. “It is important to me to make sure that any children who do not necessarily know which academy, path or career they want to go to, still have a place in our schools,” said board member Spencer Head. District officials found that several OPS high schools already have block planning. They also said that students can make changes and many of the skills they learn in a given program can be applied to many career paths. “We also know that a student’s interest can change into adulthood, which is why skills are transferable,” said Melissa Comine, OPS chief academic officer. OPS is confident that this new model will better prepare young people for life outside of the classroom. “What students learn today directly connects them to what they can do tomorrow and beyond. The focus is on trends and labor needs expected by the Nebraska Department of Labor,” said Delayne Havlovic, coordinator for vocational training at OPS.

When the Omaha Public Schools presented their plan for changes to the programming and timetables in the high schools, Superintendent Dr. Cheryl Logan that it is a call to action not to accept the status quo.

“While change is difficult, it’s the only constant in life,” said Logan. “College and career academies represent the evolution of high school programming.”

The district declares that the freshman will choose either an academy or a path. Academies are a “small learning community with a professional focus”. Pathways are “a series of four or more classes that focus on a group of related careers. Students on a pathway take courses with a variety of other students who have professional interests.”

Here is a breakdown of VET programs by school.

Benson High School:

● Academy for Health Professions
● Design and Construction Academy
● Business and Entrepreneurship Academy
● Cambridge

Bryan High School:

● Design and Construction Academy
● Transport, sales and logistics academy
● Teaching and leadership academy
● Urban Agriculture Academy
● Cambridge

Burke High School:

● Aerospace Academy
● Leadership Academy
● Communication academy

Central High School:

● Art
● leadership
● International Abitur

North High School:

● Engineering and design academy
● Academy for Science and Research
● Academy for Computer Science and Technology

Northwest High School:

● Public and non-profit service
● Early college program

South High School:

● Dual language
● Performing and visual arts
● Technology and media art
● Cambridge

New High School 156th and Ida:

● health
● sustainability
● business

New 60th and L:

● SMART technology
● Health & Education
● Cambridge

All students will attend the Freshman Academy to explore different careers. Traditional core classes will continue to be part of the curriculum.

OPS will implement block planning across the district.

Some parents are concerned about this change in planning.

“I know the block diagram is a waste of time,” said Kimberly Shaneyfelt.

The board members had their own questions.

“It is important to me to make sure that any children who do not necessarily know which academy, path or career they want to go to, still have a place in our schools,” said board member Spencer Head.

District officials found that several OPS high schools already have block planning.

They also said that students can make changes and many of the skills they learn in a given program can be applied to many career paths.

“We also know that a student’s interest can change into adulthood, which is why skills are transferable,” said Melissa Comine, OPS chief academic officer.

OPS is confident that this new model will better prepare young people for life outside of the classroom.

“What students learn today directly connects them to what they can do tomorrow and beyond. The focus is on trends and labor needs expected by the Nebraska Department of Labor,” said Delayne Havlovic, coordinator for vocational training at OPS.

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