Unspent coronavirus aid in Omaha for rent, Food Aid Nebraska News

Officials in the Omaha area are providing $ 10 million in unspent federal coronavirus aid for rent, food aid and mental health services.

Douglas County’s board member Mike Boyle said many people continue to be evicted from their homes despite a federal moratorium. And he described Tuesday’s decision to give the Metro Area Continuum of Care a $ 2 million rental and mortgage loan to the Metro Area Continuum of Care for the homeless as a “rare opportunity” to help people who are “really injured.”

District officials said many people who needed help with renting were unable to meet Federal CARES Act filing or other requirements.

“You won’t have to jump through all the hoops that the government puts together,” Boyle said.

Another $ 6 million will be allocated to mental health services, although the details have not yet been finalized. Board chairwoman Mary Ann Borgeson said it could be training for 911 operators and dispatchers, or a program that dispatches mental health professionals to help with crisis calls.

The board also unanimously approved the approval of $ 2 million for the Food Bank for the Heartland.

Thousands are taking rapid saliva-based COVID tests at UNL. 225 positive

Quarantine of the approval committee after possible exposure to COVID

PHOTOS: PANDEMIC CHANGES IN THE URBAN LANDSCAPE

Ghost town, 10.20

Bruegger’s bagels in downtown Lincoln did not survive the pandemic, although the lights remain on at two of its neighbors along Q Street – Juice Stop and Running Company. With people staying at home and working from home, the downtown area lacks the community, said business owner Nader Sepahpur. “The art community is not here, the music community is not here, entertainment is not here.”


FRANCIS GARDLER, Journal Star

Ghost town novel idea, 10.21

Ghost town novel idea, 10.21

“I love my job and want a bookstore that supports the community.” – Cinnamon Dokken, Owner, A Novel Idea, 118 N. 14th St.


FRANCIS GARDLER, Journal Star

Ghost town-Judtih Andre, 10.21

Ghost town-Judtih Andre, 10.21

“Construction is still going on, but I miss the energy people are bringing downtown.” – Judith Andre, downtown resident, with her Corgi Murray in the Mission Arts Building, 124 S. Ninth St.


FRANCIS GARDLER, Journal Star

Matt Taylor

Matt Taylor

Matt Taylor, owner of the Tavern on the Square and Other Room, has partnered with several Lincoln companies to bring flowers, candles, chocolates to the cocktail kits his bars started selling after the coronovirus pandemic outbreak in March and add cigars.


FRANCIS GARDLER, Journal Star

Ghost town boss Nadar, 10.21

Ghost town boss Nadar, 10.21

“I remember downtown when downtown was dead. I keep saying this is an opportunity to make downtown better.” – Nader Sepahpur, longtime downtown restaurant owner


FRANCIS GARDLER, Journal Star

Downtown ghost town, Husker headquarters

Downtown ghost town, Husker headquarters

“Some people agreed to come back in stores, but a lot of people were scared. They didn’t want to be in public. “- Blaine Braziel, Marketing Director, Husker Headquarters, 1120 P St.


FRANCIS GARDLER, Journal Star

Ghost Town – From the Nebraska Gift Shop

Ghost Town - From the Nebraska Gift Shop

“Instead of downsizing, we expanded. We only hope for the best. We pray a lot. – Barb Ballard, owner of From Nebraska Gift Shop, 803 Q St.


FRANCIS GARDLER, Journal Star

Downtown ghost town, Cornhusker Marriott

Downtown ghost town, Cornhusker Marriott

When the Cornhusker Marriott closed in March, it lit up a heart that shone for months over the city center.


Courtesy photo

Ghost town in the city center

Ghost town in the city center

Just before the Cornhusker Marriott reopened in August, it filled the outline of the heart that had shone for months.


Courtesy photo

A stroll downtown

A stroll downtown

A restaurant patron walks past a window art display by Kinzee Hillis called A Moment of Change in downtown Lincoln on October 19.


Kenneth Ferriera, JOURNAL STAR

A stroll downtown

A stroll downtown

Few rooms are lit on a Monday evening at Graduate Lincoln.


Kenneth Ferriera, JOURNAL STAR

A stroll downtown

A stroll downtown

A person walks past the scooter’s recently closed location on Haymarket. Two downtown locations, including one in the Gold’s Building, will be closed. Owner Jason Metcalf said the shutdown wasn’t due to the pandemic – in fact, he said overall sales of scooters have increased overall since the COVID-19 hit – but because the company is working to make sure all locations have drives feature. Thrus.


Kenneth Ferriera, JOURNAL STAR

A stroll downtown

A stroll downtown

After Marcus Theaters closed all locations in mid-March, the Grand Downtown has reopened with limited opening times.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

A stroll downtown

A stroll downtown

A note on the door at Rusty Taco, 210 N. 14th St., says it will reopen in June, but not. There is a second location open on 27th and Pine Lake Roads.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

A stroll downtown

A stroll downtown

Advertisements encourage customers to wear masks in downtown Lincoln. Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird said she believes Lancaster County’s mask mandate has helped people feel more comfortable out shopping and has helped companies stay open as outbreaks can pull their workforce off.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

A stroll downtown

A stroll downtown

A person walks the sidewalk in downtown Lincoln on October 19.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

A stroll downtown

A stroll downtown

Misty’s Restaurant and Lounge is empty as downtown Lincoln opening hours are reduced on October 19th.


Kenneth Ferriera, JOURNAL STAR

A stroll downtown

A stroll downtown

Two bikers ride the sidewalk in downtown Lincoln on October 19th.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

Olsson 10.5

Olsson 10.5

Office workers focus on their duties as many of their colleagues’ cubicles remain empty on October 5th in Olsson, downtown Lincoln. The number of employees in the office has been significantly lower since COVID-19 hit Lincoln in March.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

Olsson 10.5

Olsson 10.5

An employee’s calendar markings stop in mid-March when COVID-19 hit Lincoln and many office workers started working remotely.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

Olsson 10.5

Olsson 10.5

Memorabilia and souvenirs were left behind as many office workers at Olsson now work remotely. The number of office workers in downtown has been significantly lower since COVID-19 hit Lincoln in March.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

Olsson 10.5

Olsson 10.5

Office workers focus on their duties as many of their colleagues’ cubicles in Olsson, Lincoln’s West Haymarket, remain empty. The number of employees in the office has been significantly lower since COVID-19 hit Lincoln in March.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

Olsson 10.5

Olsson 10.5

Tyler Troxel (left) is consulting with Brandon Roesler in a mostly vacant office space in Olsson, as many of her employees will be working remotely on October 5th. The number of office workers in downtown has been significantly lower since COVID-19 hit Lincoln in March.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

Brakes, cyclists during the pandemic

Brakes, cyclists during the pandemic

Sales and occupation tax receipts down

Sales and occupation tax receipts down

Parking revenue during COVID-19

Parking revenue during COVID-19

YMCA shut down

YMCA shut down

The Lincoln YMCA announced on October 22nd that it would permanently close the Downtown YMCA on 11th Street and P Street.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star File Photo

YMCA shut down

YMCA shut down

The downtown YMCA on 11th Street and P Street will be permanently closed, the Lincoln YMCA said Thursday.


KENNETH FERRIERA, Journal Star

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